Tag Archive for Doodle Poodle dogs

Oodles of Noodles and some thoughts about Doodles and TToodles

19 February 2018

Michael - BISS - Bay Colony 2013

Billie’s sire, GRCHG CH Rinchen’s Blazing Black Icon, with Nina Wagner, Mark Desrosiers and the Judge. BCTTC Specialty 2013.

Titles are important in the dog world.  You can’t put an AKC Title on a dog without an AKC registration number.  And you can’t put an AKC registration number on a Doodle or a TToodle or any canine who is not a member of an AKC registered breed.  Doodles, TToodles and other cross bred dogs cannot be registered with the AKC and the American Kennel Club is the primary registration organization in the American dog world.  The same is true in England and other countries around the world.  Only pure bred dogs of a registered breed can be registered.

I am extremely proud to be an AKC Breeder of Merit and pride myself on both the genetic quality and conformation to the Tibetan Terrier breed standard of my foundation stud, dam and all of the TTs in my breeding program.  That AKC stamp of approval is evidenced by conformation titles like Champion, Grand Champion, Bronze, Silver, Gold and other titles that can be earned in the Conformation ring.  You can’t compete in the AKC Conformation ring without an AKC registration number.  There are no mixed breed dogs in AKC sanctioned conformation dog shows.

billie-jean-110516-group-placing

GRCHB Kensington’s 1st Dance with Michael (Billie), Non Sporting Group Placing, 5 Nov 2016.

Kensington Tibetan Terriers is committed to protecting the Tibetan Terrier breed standard through careful selection of a minimum of second generation breeding stock AND the stamp of titled approval from the American Kennel Club.

The quality of the offspring is rarely better than the quality of the parents.  This is why responsible breeders seek sires and dams to improve upon the flaws in their breeding stock.  This is the goal for which all responsible breeders strive: to protect and improve the quality of the dogs in our chosen breeds.

Genetic management is critical, if we are to maintain and improve the quality of our dogs.  Genetic testing confirms whether your breeding stock carries the mutations for which each breed is known to potentially have.  When you breed dogs of different registered breeds, you DOUBLE the potential for mutant genetic and physiological conditions for which you must test.  Doodle breeders should be performing the genetic testing and registering the results on the parents AND on the offspring, for the two breeds being combined.  But they don’t.  Additionally, because breeding dogs of different breeds is SIGNIFICANTLY more variable than an outcross, you end up with the potential for behavioral and genetic diversity more akin to breeding a miniature horse with a Clydesdale.  Will the offspring be ‘cute’?  Maybe.  But what have you truly got?  A great big question mark, when it comes to genetic mutations that are linked to breed-specific physiological issues.

GRCH Kensington's Oliver Twist, winning his AKC Championship title at nine months of age.

GRCH Kensington’s Oliver Twist, winning his AKC Championship at nine months of age in 2010.

Responsible Tibetan Terrier breeders are proud to be members of our National Club, the Tibetan Terrier Club of America (ttca-online.org).  Not all breeders choose to be on the Breeder Referral List.  I choose not to be on the Breeder Referral List, because there is much more demand for my puppies than there are available puppies, and I see no reason to stimulate demand for something that is not available.  Forever families already choose to wait months for a Kensington Tibetan Terrier puppy.

Moses Sire of Beckham

Markus Gisslen showing Ti La Shu, Just Magic for Tazz Jazz (Moses), Sire of Beckham, 2016.

The idea that someone could improve the quality of a registered breed by breeding a member of that breed to a member of a different breed holds no arguable merit.  I suggest this, because there is no governing body over ANY of these cross bred combinations.  And as with any profession, members of that profession CHOOSE to be overseen by their National organizations and apply for membership and proudly display that membership certificate for all to see, especially to potential clients.

There are no membership organizations for breeders of cross bred dogs.  And you will find cross bred puppies available from backyard breeders, because no registrations are required and no genetic testing, either.  Breeders of cross bred dogs are not held accountable to any standards by any entity.

Pedigree Beckham

Three generations of Tibetan Terriers behind Beckham, Shadeacre Fast Love at Kensington.  All registered and many international Champions.

 

Until such day as any of these breed combinations is recognized by the American Kennel Club as a valid breed in its own right, I will question the validity that ANY of the Oodle combinations is ‘better’ than a properly bred animal of a single registered breed.  Why even bother on trying to improve upon the Poodle?  You have color and size options already available.  Just ask Wendell Sammett.  And the Labrador Retriever?  It has remained the top breed in the United States, with 2017 being the 26th year in a row.  Clearly, this breed has an extensive and loyal following.

If, however, you are committed to seeking a Noodle, a Doodle or some other Designer Dog of the Day, do your own research.  Don’t make a decision based upon emotion or assumptions.  Visit the breeder.  Be sure the dogs are being raised respectfully and in clean conditions.  ASK to see the genetic testing histories on both sire and dam.  Go to the parent breed club web sites or to the AKC web site and research the health risks of BOTH breeds.  ASK which ailments plague the sire and dam – and talk to a groomer, before you make your final decision.  Groomers have a wealth of experience earned by working with many, many breeds and many cross bred dogs.  Their opinions are valid.  Do your due diligence.

I, for one, won’t ever suggest a cross bred dog to a forever family.  I would rather see forever homes welcome a dog or puppy from a national breed rescue program, first – and from a local animal shelter, second.  The TTCA National Rescue effort can be explored on our National club’s web site:  ttca-online.org/html/rescue.html

As for a dog from your local animal shelter, just think about the photos we saw on television during the holidays.  Please support your local animal shelter and rescue a dog in need.